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Manuel Pellegrini: The Once-Charming Man Who Tarnished His Legacy

There’s no hiding place on the internet. We can all feel stupid laughing at David James  who predicted City finishing outside the Top 4 this season, and I stayed up most of the night deleting all the articles I wrote saying nice things about Manuel Pellegrini. Charming my arse.

There were a lot of ridiculously angry people at the Etihad yesterday, venting their spleen and getting most upset over some men kicking a football around, badly. We invest a lot of time, effort, money and emotion in the team we support, but with hindsight, tweeting abuse to the wife of Martin Demichelis probably won’t help matters in the long term,  and perhaps suggests you’re something of a cretin to boot.

But apart from the fact that finishing outside the top four would be both embarrassing and a huge blow to the plans of Pep Guardiola, would seriously hamper eight years of preparation that led up to this point, apart from that, it is simply baffling that we find ourselves at this point. And the saddest thing of all is that Manuel Pellegrini has successfully dismantled his legacy at the club, and, along with others, seriously damaged the near-future too.

I can accept City not winning the league – it happens, and it will happen many times. Sometimes teams don’t perform to their potential, sometimes managers make mistakes, injuries hamper progress, decisions go against you, whatever. We won a cup, got a day out at Wembley, have progressed further in the Champions League than before, and a top four finish would have meant an ok season, but with the bonus of Pep coming in and hopefully weaving his magic. A low level of competence would have seen City reach these goals with so many teams misfiring in the chasing pack. Mancini had his bad season too, and is still revered – that’s why this season was vital to the way Pellegrini would be judged, and after such a scintillating start why what has followed has both baffled and disappointed so many. And a top four finish would mean a season without Champions League football for United, Chelsea and Liverpool, we could have been in pole position for years to come, unless you believe 20 years of Leicester City dominance is forthcoming.

But I guess this is the City way. Somehow, going into the international break, City sit in the top four. Somehow. They have a dodgy penalty call at Stamford Bridge to thank for that, and the strangest season in Premier League history to thank too. Any other season, and we’d probably be out of the race already. The international break gives the manager the chance to welcome back De Bruyne and Nasri, though don’t be surprised if Aguero and others manage to pick up knocks whilst jetting round the world.

You’ve probably seen many of the statistics on this season, and they are truly horrific. City have picked up 36 points in the last 25 games. That’s the form of a lower mid-table team, and that’s the form of six whole months. Southampton are the only semi-decent team beaten in the whole season. We failed to score against United, and took a few pastings too. Decisions have gone against us sometimes, injuries have been harsh, but there is no excuse for statistics like this, not with the squad that Pellegrini has at his disposal. The Pep announcement can thus not be blamed for the poor form as it was rubbish anyway, though it has somehow managed to get worse, which is quite the achievement. City may not have beaten many decent teams all season, but since the news that our managers were changing in the summer, we haven’t even beaten one of the top sixteen in the league. We’re running out of teams to beat, and the only exception was an Aston Villa team that literally didn’t want to be on the pitch, and they still held out until the 2nd half. You wonder not only where the next win is coming from, but how on earth we will hang onto 4th place. The bookies still make us favourites, for reasons that escape me. Either way, managers and players move on all the time, so the news of change should not really affect the players, who should have the professionalism and desire to want to win trophies right now, this season.

And yet in the same way that Louis Van Gaal pulls out a result when he seems doomed, so City have performed well enough away from the league to confuse matters somewhat. The Champions League progress and group win, the League Cup in the bag, two teams dispatched with ease in the FA Cup (two teams we couldn’t score against in the league), before waving the white flag at Chelsea. A strange season when poor form is so focused on one competition, and sadly the competition that matters most to most of us.

And with hindsight the demise has been brewing for eighteen months. The situation has been masked somewhat by the bizarre club record running win in the league right in the middle, straddling two seasons that both secured 2nd place last season then had the press declaring us champions in waiting this. But a couple of injuries and it all went to pot. Losing a spine of a team will disrupt any squad, whatever the budget, but the problems go far deeper than that, far further than one man alone. The players themselves must take flak as the buck stops with them, whilst the transfer policies that were praised at season-start look far flakier now, and you wonder just how wisely we have spent after all. On defenders alone, it has clearly been haphazard and downright disastrous.

It’s easy to be swayed by a bad run though. Chelsea showed that changing managers can reinvigorate, and only two months ago Pep Guardiola was widely called a coward for taking the easy option at City. Now there’s widespread talk of a huge squad overhaul being necessary. The truth, as always. lies somewhere in between.

And so bad is the situation, so lethargic is the play, that many want sacked a man who is leaving in two months anyway, which speaks volumes about the rapid decline that has hit this team. The supporters of Pellegrini are dwindling away to family friends and asylum members. Get Brian Kidd in. Get Vieira back, somehow. What’s Alan Curbishley up to these days?

And the saddest thing for me is that Pellegrini, who had his critics from the start, will leave with few supporters. His stubbornness, strange tactics, failure to prepare for the opposition and reluctance to take pressure off the squad by trusting in youth has left a jaded squad stumbling towards the summer. No players have improved, many have regressed. For all the negativity and gloom around the club right now, it has rarely been in better shape and we as fans have gone through much, much worse, but I cannot remember a time I have wanted a season to end so much. That’s partly due to Pep, but also due to the awful form that has spread an apathy and anger around the stands. Add ridiculous pricing policies from our owners and the result will be plenty of empty seats in the remaining games for the banter boys to laugh at.

The title is gone, it was gone weeks ago. Somehow this squad must regroup and fight for that Champions League place, or else the progress of the club will be damaged greatly. There are certain players that cannot be trusted right now, and it’s time the manager realised that and played to his squad’s strengths. Maybe, just maybe, with a bit of luck in front of goal and the return of crucial players, this season can be saved. I can’t say I’m hopeful.
Still, there’s no hiding on the internet. So imagine how embarrassed I’ll be about this blog when City go on to win the league.

2 thoughts on “Manuel Pellegrini: The Once-Charming Man Who Tarnished His Legacy”

  1. Nice read HH

    As bad as it seems right now the truth is we are on the verge of something great. Next season will see a different approach. Fit players who don’t pick up regular injuries, an influx of younger talent both from within the ranks and the top leagues in the world and a manager that can adapt his tactics to the opposition we play.

    Keep the faith blues

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