CITY

Manchester City 2017/18 Season Ticket Prices: My Outrage At The Meagre Rises

Tuesday morning, 10am. The moment of truth. That feeling in my stomach I get when an email arrives telling me if my loan application has been accepted. I know the answer before I click on the mouse button.
And once more I opened an email, a different type of email, knowing what to expect, and I was not surprised.

The rumours, for once, were true, kind of. Manchester City had released season ticket prices for the 207/18 season, and prices had risen by an average of 2.5% it seemed, though 5% was the initial rumour. A few freezes, a few rises more than 2.5%. Prices decided by a random number generator it seems.

I don’t need to read a single line of the club blurb to know the justification that the club will present to fans for the rise – competitive prices, especially compared to rival clubs, monthly payments, cheap seats available, help the club compete blah blah blah.

My ticket is well-priced, the rise manageable, just £10 spread out over a year, but for me that misses the point. And whilst 2.5% on £380 is peanuts, it’s obviously more the greater the cost of the season ticket. It will be £40+ for some.

For the outlay on the team, the last three years have been rather underwhelming. Hey, that’s football, I for one don’t demand success, but coming off 36 months that has largely flattered to deceive, the club could have made a gesture. The country is on its arse, many long-standing fans have already been priced out of attending, times are hard for so many, and a club owned by billionaires that has raised revenue to one of the largest in Europe away from match-day revenue and will only raise it further in the coming years could have helped the fans and made a gesture. With Pep Guardiola reportedly complaining about the atmosphere and demanding Txiki sort the problems, then whoever makes such decisions goes and raises prices, a move that will dull the “match day experience” even more.
So with expanding corporate areas, tunnel clubs and tyre sponsors, no rise was needed. Piss off the fans and drive them away, and the atmosphere gets even worse. Reduce prices and they get the full house they desire every match, they make more money on the day, the atmosphere improves, some deserters may return and the home form might even get better.

Let’s cut to the chase. What the f**k were they thinking when they decided to do this? All those club surveys all the feedback gratefully received, the supposed monitoring of online forums. To hell with it all, eh? It’s a PR disaster from the club, the equivalent of putting Bobby Charlton in charge of the ticket office.

The key point for me is this: the money gained from each rise is irrelevant – meaningless. A loss of support from the fans for such meagre gains. With each passing year at City, with each rise in commercial revenue and with each TV deal, ticket sales comprise a smaller wedge of City’s total revenue – I have heard that it currently accounts for 15%.
All of City’s match day revenue could have been covered for a year just by the rise in the last TV deal – not all the revenue from the TV deal, just the increase compared to the previous one. With that in mind, consider how much difference a 2.5% rise makes to City’s ability to compete. It’s a televised game (or part of one), it’s helping pay one of our 70 loaned out players’ wages for a few months, it’s putting revenue up by a fraction of one percent. Worth it, City?
Paying for Messi? It would barely cover the private jet over here, let alone his digs at the Lowry as he acclimatises to horizontal rain and four seasons in a day.
Let’s not forget that the difference between finishing 3rd and 4th in the Premier League is £2m for starters, more than double what these rises will bring in. Fall to fifth and City could have taken a chunk off ticket prices and it would lose them no more than the drop in league positions. And still that stupid Platinum scheme persists, allowing loyalty to be bought, and still prices for single purchases are the most exorbitant of all.

Football fans like to make gestures, most of them empty threats. Never getting Sky again because it’s all United fans on the panels. Nor BT, biased arses. Not buying a Sharp product, never having a red car.
As I said, mostly futile nonsense. But for those that were already disillusioned with modern football, even a small price rise could be the final straw, the tipping point that makes a minority of fans decide not to renew, to commit their weekends to B & Q, garden centres and Football Focus. Others will drop out of cup schemes instead, so any money gained will be lost elsewhere, attendances for the smaller games will dwindle and the empty seat counters’ heads will explode with glee.

We must stop the idea that fans are there to be fleeced – that if a price is affordable, it is acceptable. Of course my season ticket, at £390, to watch the best set of players I have witnessed, is good value. Of course a £10 price increase, spread over 10 months is affordable, whatever my wage. But I’m sorry, that’s not good enough. Fans have spent 30 years being fleeced by their clubs, who knew they had a monopoly and a near-captive audience. Ticket prices have increased by almost 1000% since the 1980’s and we all accepted it. Thankfully in recent years, once we ignore the pitiful bedroom-dwelling banter boys counting empty seats, many have said enough is enough, and have given up or fought back.

So yeah, this small rise means nothing in the scheme of things. It’s the price of one takeaway, a padded cinema seat (only the best for me), or a medium coke in the foyer. But I’m not going to shrug my shoulders this time and move on.

The rise makes no commercial sense. You wonder how City’s decision makers sat down and came to this decision. The need to get that revenue creeping up, come what may? Cos this will make a huge difference! Small increases are a classic tactic to creep the prices up, but I’m not sure City have read the situation very well on this occasion. Not everyone has had a rise either – it seems from early indications, as I type furiously without the full facts to hand, that the £299 seats have remained at the same price. Nice move by City says the cynic in me (that’s basically all of me), as they can still claim to have some of the cheapest seats in the Premier League. Expect this price to continue to figure prominently on all promotional material.

And that’s what frustrates me when it boils down to it. This was a missed opportunity. Other teams are announcing price freezes – they understand the economic situation, they see where the game is heading if they keep making football more and more expensive to attend. Even the kings of leeches over at Old Trafford have frozen season ticket prices for many years now. So did City look at the situation and come to the same conclusion? No, they managed to somehow antagonise fans with little gain for themselves – rises too small to make any noticeable difference to the business model, but rises nevertheless that will piss off sections of our fan base.

I’m aware this comes across as whiny, ungracious snowflake behaviour. Don’t get me wrong, I love what our owners have done for this club – it’s changed everything, my experiences have been transformed, probably forever. The club have done many wonderful things, and priced many tickets well, especially in cup competitions – and the prices for the 3rd tier of the south stand could not be disagreed with – they were spot on.  Monthly payments was a life-saver for me, an excellent change from the powers that be, and new age price bands for next season seem to have helped a few too. Credit where credit is due.

In the early days after the takeover, I felt the owners’ wealth gave them a wonderful opportunity to do some different, unique, for City fans, to lower prices to ridiculous levels – Financial Fair Play probably stopped any notion of that dead in its tracks anyway, but now, with record revenue and further riches guaranteed, a small gesture would not only have been welcomed, placating the fan base, but would not have damaged the team on the pitch. Levante are giving regular attenders free season tickets next season, but it seems City can’t even freeze their prices.
I just don’t get it. It seems you can’t even personalise your card anymore either, so sourcing that picture of the 1981 team photo was a complete waste of time too. Still, frees room for a new sponsor on the back of the cards.

That was a long whine for a £1 monthly rise on something I commit so much of my spare time too. If you’re happy with prices I would not wish to persuade you otherwise, I neither expect nor demand universal outrage over a 2.5% price rise that precedes another £150m summer spending spree. But it is so frustrating to me. This club could be different, it could be better than the rest. And it could be that with little or no sacrifice. It chose not to for the price of a scoreboard.

Still, can’t wait for the first game in August.

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